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Nancy Fell

Dr. Nancy Fell is a UC Foundation Professor in the Physical Therapy Department, where she teaches neuroscience and adult neurorehabilitation. She received her B.S. in Physical Therapy from St. Louis University, St. Louis, MO in 1987, M.S. in Advanced/Neurologic Physical Therapy from Washington University, St. Louis, MO in 1992, and Ph.D. in Motor Control with a Minor in Gerontology, from the University of Tennessee Knoxville, TN in 2001.

In 1995, Dr. Fell was recognized as a Board Certified Specialist in Neurologic Physical Therapy. She recertified in 2005 and was designated Emeritus status in 2015. She received the American Physical Therapy Association’s Lucy Blair Service Award in 2016 for outstanding professional service. Dr. Fell was recognized with The Stanford Award for most influential article in the Journal of Physical Therapy Education in 2011 with co-authors T Mohr, D Ingram, and R Mabey. She has also been awarded with the Outstanding Alumnus Award from Washington University in St. Louis, Program in Physical Therapy (2009) as well as five outstanding faculty awards over the years from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga’s College of Health, Education, and Professional Studies, for teaching, professional service, and grantsmanship.

Dr. Fell has a long history of deep engagement in the physical therapy profession. She has served as a member of the Board of Directors of the Tennessee Physical Therapy Association and has coordinated national professional development educational programming for the American Physical Therapy Association and the Academy of Neurologic Physical Therapy. Dr. Fell currently serves as Secretary and Board of Directors Member for the Academy of Neurologic Physical Therapy.

Dr. Fell’s research interests are in the area of stroke rehabilitation. She collaborates with computer science and engineering faculty and students in data analytics to support clinical decision-making and employing mobile technology to support stroke recovery and decrease stroke recurrence.